Welcome!

I have been researching my family tree since my paternal grandfather died in 1976. Whilst researching my mother's ancestry I started recording every instance of her maternal grandmother's name FARMERY and so my one-name study was born! I now record every instance of the name I find all over the world, and my database currently contains over 51,600 name events. I am constructing family trees for each family group and try to put distant cousins in touch!

My study covers the FARMERY surname and known variants such as FARMEARY, FARMEREY, FARMARY and FARMERIE, as well as instances of the name being used as a forename rather than surname.


Tuesday, 2 August 2016

2016 Farmery Gathering

[The Workhouse, Southwell]

Saturday October 1st 2016 will see the sixteenth international Farmery gathering, once again in the village hall at Bracebridge Heath, near Lincoln (LN4 2LB).

Guests this year are already confirmed from as far away as Canada and, provisionally, Australia!

•10.00am Registration and Coffee

•10.30am Welcome and Introductions [Alan Moorhouse]

•10.45am "Life and Times at the Workhouse" [Colin Deeley]

•11.45am DNA update [Alan Moorhouse]

•12.00pm Open/workshop session

•12.30pm Lunch (at leisure)

•1.45pm Afternoon session commences

•2.00pm "Lincolnshire Wolds" [Jean Howard]

•3.00pm WW1 Project [Alan Moorhouse]

•3.15pm Open/workshop session

•4.00pm Group photograph

•4.15pm Tea

•4.30pm Close

Colin Deeley retired from the Royal Air Force after 40 years as a pilot.  He has been a National Trust volunteer for nearly 22 years working at Belton House, Grantham, and Southwell Workhouse, and gives talks about the National Trust. 

Jean Howard came to Lincolnshire at the age of 5.  She worked for some years for the County Library Service where she dealt with local history enquiries and staffed the mobile library travelling around much of the north of the county and this developed her fascination with all aspects of Lincolnshire.  She is a qualified Blue Badge Guide and leads walking and bus tours in Lincolnshire and speaks on various aspects of the county's architecture, history and people.  Her Wolds talk inlcudes geology, topography, early roads, development of agriculture (including warrening which will be of interest to those in the Walesby family!)

On the day amongst other documents that I have available will be print outs of every Farmery family in the 1939 Register, which was taken in order to issue identity cards and ration books, so you will be able to see where your Farmery relations were living at the outbreak of the 2nd World War!

For those wanting to make a weekend of it there will be an informal gathering at the Premier Inn Canwick on Friday evening, a more formal dinner in Lincoln on Saturday evening and a visit on Sunday morning.

This is non-profit making event and for the day there is a nominal charge of £7.50 to cover hire of the hall, speakers and refreshments.

For more information or to advise that you plan to attend the gathering please email me.

[The provisional date for next year is Saturday September 30th 2017].

Saturday, 22 August 2015

2015 Farmery Gathering


[Torksey Lock is the gateway to the ancient Foss Dyke from the tidal River Trent for boats heading towards Lincoln]

Saturday September 26th 2015 will see the fiftheenth international Farmery gathering, once again in the village hall at Bracebridge Heath, near Lincoln (LN4 2LB).

Guests this year are already confirmed from as far away as Australia!

•10.00am Registration and Coffee

•10.30am Welcome and Introductions [Alan Moorhouse]

•10.45am "A Look at Lincolnshire Dialect" [Loretta Rivett]

•11.45am DNA update [Alan Moorhouse]

•12.00pm Open/workshop session

•12.30pm Lunch (at leisure)

•1.45pm Afternoon session commences

•2.00pm "Along the Foss Canal" [Chris Hewis]

•3.00pm WW1 Project [Alan Moorhouse]

•3.15pm Open/workshop session

•4.00pm Group photograph

•4.15pm Tea

•4.30pm Close

Loretta Rivett was born and brought up at the foot of the Lincolnshire Wolds and is a Lincolnshire dialect speaker.  She has had a lifetime interest in the local dialect, recording words and sayings, reading dialect poetry and prose, as well as studying the history of the English language.  She has had numerous appearances on television and radio and consultations by authors, researchers and language coaches. 

Chris Hewis is Chair of Saxilby and District History Group and the Treasurer of the Society for Lincolnshire History and Archaeology. He has written several books and articles on local history and appears regularly on BBC Radio Lincolnshire.  His talk is a pictorial journey along England’s oldest canal.

For those wanting to make a weekend of it there will be an informal gathering at the Premier Inn Canwick on Friday evening, a more formal dinner in Lincoln on Saturday evening and a visit on Sunday morning.

This is non-profit making event and for the day there is a nominal charge of £7.50 to cover hire of the hall, speakers and refreshments.

For more information or to advise that you plan to attend the gathering please email me.

[The provisional date for next year is Saturday September 17th or Saturday October 1st 2016].

Friday, 22 August 2014

2014 Farmery Gathering




Saturday September 27th 2014 will see the fourteenth international Farmery gathering, once again in the village hall at Bracebridge Heath, near Lincoln (LN4 2LB).

Guests this year are already confirmed from as far away as Pennyslvania!

The first gathering was held on May 20th 2000, then every year from September 28th 2002.


•10.00am Registration and Coffee

•10.30am Welcome and Introductions (Alan Moorhouse)

•10.45am Epworth Old Rectory: The Physic Garden (Cath Fordham)

•11.45am DNA update (Graham Farmer)

•12.00pm Open/workshop session

•12.30pm Lunch (at leisure)

•1.45pm Afternoon session commences

•2.00pm The Landships of Lincoln (Richard Pullen MA)

•3.00pm WW1 Project (Alan Moorhouse)

•3.15pm Open/workshop session

•4.00pm Group photograph

•4.15pm Raffle, Tea

•4.30pm Close


Cath Fordham is a volunteer at Epworth Old Rectory, the home in which Samuel Wesley, Rector of the parish of St. Andrew, Epworth, and his wife Susanna brought up their sons, John and Charles Wesley, who went on to develop the Methodist Movement.  The Physic Garden has plants growing that John Wesley used in his book of home-spun remedies 'Primitive Physic'.

Richard Pullen is a professional archaeologist and writer (with 4 books and numerous articles published in the past 10 years) and chairman of the Friends of the Lincoln Tank.

The raffle (donations of a prize are most welcome) will be in aid of the National StarCollege in Cheltenham.

For those wanting to make a weekend of it there will be an informal gathering at the Premier Inn Canwick on Friday evening, a more formal dinner in Lincoln on Saturday evening and a visit on Sunday morning. 

For more information or to advise that you plan to attend the gathering please email me.

[The date for next year is provisionally Saturday September 19th 2015].

Sunday, 28 July 2013

2013 Farmery gathering

Saturday September 28th 2013 will see the thirteenth international Farmery gathering, once again in the village hall at Bracebridge Heath, near Lincoln (LN4 2LB).

Guests this year are already confirmed from as far away as Australia!

The first gathering was held on May 20th 2000, then every year from September 28th 2002.


•10.00am Registration and Coffee

•10.30am Welcome and Introductions (Alan Moorhouse)

•10.45am Old Lincolnshire - Preserving Local History on Film (film show by Lincolnshire Film Archive)

•11.45am DNA update

•12.00pm Open/workshop session

•12.30pm Lunch (at leisure)

•1.45pm Afternoon session commences

•2.00pm The Skivvy - Victorian Domestic Servants in Ordinary Families (Susan Deal)

•3.00pm Open/workshop session

•4.00pm Group photograph

•4.15pm Raffle, Tea

•4.30pm Close


Lincolnshire Film Archive was set up in 1986 to locate and preserve motion picture film showing life and work in all parts of the county.  They have some amazing footage of the local area and members restore and repair old film.

Dr Susan Deal is a historian with a particular interest in everyday life in the Victorian period and is a member of the Victorian Society and editor of their South Yorkshire Group regional newsletter.
The raffle (donations of a prize are most welcome) will be in aid of the National Star College in Cheltenham.

For those wanting to make a weekend of it there will be an informal gathering at the Premier Inn Canwick on Friday evening, a more formal dinner in Lincoln on Saturday evening and a visit on Sunday morning. 

For more information or too advise that you plan to attend the gathering please email me.

[The date for next year is provisionally Saturday September 27th 2014 when it is hoped we will have guests from both Canada and Pennsylvania].

Saturday, 20 April 2013

A Lincolnshire Shepherd

Lincolnshire Life July 1969
(purchased on eBay April 2013)
photograph by H D Martineau

"George Farmery lives in Old Bolingbroke.  We nearly described him as a 'typical' Lincolnshire shepherd - and perhaps he is if his care and solicitude for his sheep are the yardstick for a good shepherd.  But Mr. Farmery, now 77 years of age, has been shepherding since he clipped his first sheep at the age of thirteen, sixty four years ago - and shepherds with sixty-four years service are few and far between.  A resident of Old Bolingbroke for 30 years, George Farmery was born in a family of 10, at nearby Asgarby [sic], a weakly baby who was not expected by the doctor to live more than a month.  Yet he is still working regularly and out and about in all weathers.

Where sheep are concerned he has done everything.  Who, for example, can imagine driving 1132 sheep through the middle of Boston with only his dog in support?  George did it in 1931.  He once caught and clipped 70 sheep in a day when the pay for clipping was only 3/- a score - and would the wool as well.  Only a year ago he clipped 18 sheep in 2 1/2 hours before 7.30am., and at sixty-five walked for 14 hours and 7 1/2 miles with 400 sheep on one bottle of lemonade for sustenance.

A salute, then for George Farmery, Lincolnshire Shepherd, survivor of a diminishing race.  He and his kind will not be seen again."

George James FARMERY was born 29.4.1892 in Asterby and baptised there 29.5.1892, son of Joseph FARMERY "Mr James Walton's foreman", and his wife Fanny.

Joseph FARMERY age 24 labourer of East Barkwith (son of James FARMERY deceased) married Fanny OVERTON age 19 of East Barkwith (daughter of John OVERTON carrier) at East Barkwith 12.6.1876.

The family were living at:
1876 - East Barkwith (marriage)
1877 - South Willingham - birth of daughter Mary Ann
1879 - Asterby - birth and baptism of daughter Fanny
1881 - Glebe, Asterby (census)
1883 - East Barkwith - birth of daughter Hannah
1889 - Hatton - birth of daughter Martha
1891 - Foreman's House, Asterby (census)
1893 - Asterby - birth and baptism of son George James
1894 - North Willingham - burial of daughter Fanny
1894 - North Willingham - birth of daughter Maud Miriam
1901 - village, Calcethorpe (census) - George was a scholar
1911 - Gayton le Wold (census) - George James was a farm labourer.

The 1911 census shows that Joseph and Fanny FARMERY had been married 34 years and that only 5 of their 10 children were still living; I have yet to identify the 4 children who died as infants.

Joseph FARMERY was born in 1851 at East Torrington and was the grandson of George FARMERY of Walesby who married Anne PUTTERGILL 12.6.1816 at Faldingworth.

George James FARMERY married Ellen BOSNELL in 1916 and they had three children Doris M, Basil R and Margaret Eve.  Ellen FARMERY of 35 Alma Place, Spilsby died 20.3.1974 and in 1977 George remarried Agnes Maud HUBBARD (nee SMITH) widow of George HUBBARD. 

George James FARMERY of 33 Old Market Avenue, Spilsby died 7.1.1979 and his widow Agnes Maud FARMERY was living in Bardney and died in Lincoln 3.11.1987.

Sunday, 16 September 2012

2012 annual Farmery gathering




Saturday September 22nd 2012 will see the twelth international Farmery gathering in the village hall at Bracebridge Heath, near Lincoln (LN4 2LB).


Guests this year are already confirmed from Italy and Australia!
The first gathering was held on May 20th 2000, then every year from September 28th 2002.


•10.00am Registration and Coffee

•10.30am Welcome and Introductions (Alan Moorhouse)

•10.45am Castles in the Sky - Oral Evidence for Family History Research (Simon Powley)

•11.45am Open/workshop session

•12.30pm Lunch (at leisure)

•1.45pm Afternoon session commences

•2.00pm Interesting Characters of Lincolnshire (Lynda Hotchkiss)

•3.00pm Open/workshop session

•4.15pm Raffle, Tea

•4.30pm Close

Dr Simon Powley teaches Drama and English at a Lincolnshire secondary school; he is a former vice chair of Lincolnshire Family History Society and has been a historical consultant to North Kesteven District Council.

Lynda Hotchkiss used to be researcher in residence at Lincolnshire Archives and is now a freelance research consultant with G&LH Search and well known local speaker who returns once again to a Farmery gathering!

The raffle will be in aid of the Star Appeal at the National Star College in Cheltenham.

For those waniting to make a weekend of it there will be an informal gathering at The Premier Inn Canwick on Friday evening, a more formal dinner in Lincoln on Saturday evening and a visit on Sunday morning.

For more information please email me.

Saturday, 5 March 2011

Where will you be on Sunday March 27th 2011?

Sunday March 27th is the date for the 2011 UK census. Where will you be that day?

There is talk of this being the last ever census and for the first time the return can be completed and submitted on line.

A census has been taken every 10 years since 1801 with the exception of 1941, which was in the middle of WW2, though there was a "min-census" on Friday September 29th 1939 so that everybody could be isued with a national identity card.
  • 1841 Sunday June 6th
  • 1851 Sunday March 30th
  • 1861 Sunday April 7th
  • 1871 Sunday April 2nd
  • 1881 Sunday April 3rd
  • 1891 Sunday April 5th
  • 1901 Sunday March 31st
  • 1911 Sunday April 2nd

The early census' (1801 to 1831) were simply a head count but from 1841 onwards the names and other details of individuals were recorded. In 1841 adult ages were rounded down to the nearest 5 years then from 1851 "age last birthday" was recorded. I have print outs of every person called FARMERY (or a variant) in each census from 1841 to 1911.

Census returns are closed to public access for 100 years so the 2011 census will not be searchable until 2112! The most recent census to be released was from 1911 - ordinarily this would not have been open until January 1st 2012 but under the Freedom of Information Act most informaton was released early, in 2010, due to an anomaly in the wording of the 1911 Census Act. In 1911, for the first time, there was the additional information of how long a couple had been married and how many children there were to the marriage, both living and dead.

If this is going to be the last ever census, and because of the 100 closure rule, why not keep a copy of your return for the benefit of your descendants who might be interested in their genealogy?